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Cycle Algoma's Newest Route

Put this extension of the Great Lakes Waterfront Trail on your list of bucket rides.

The Lake Huron Waterfront Trail



Get on your bikes and ride! There are plenty of reasons why cyclists will love Algoma Country: scenic country roads, scenic waterfront views, roads that lead to attractions, great places to eat, or stop to get a pint. 

The Lake Huron Waterfront Trail is a trail you’ll want to make sure is on your list of Ontario Bucket Rides. The bike trail leads cyclists from the shores of Lake Superior to Sault Ste. Marie, then east along Lake Huron to Northeastern Ontario, offering a varied terrain of paved country roads, Trans Canada Highway 17 and local trail systems. The route is scenic with views of Lake Huron, rolling farmland, bridges over rivers, and even a few waterfalls. This 5-day, 370 km route will take cyclists through 22 communities, three First Nation Territories and 10 villages, hamlets and towns.

No matter where you start or pick up the trail, you’ll find plenty of places and attractions to stop, restaurants and places to stay. Below are just some of things to see and do, places to eat and stay on this section of the route.

Spanish to Blind River (53 km)

When visiting Spanish, a must for cyclists is the Shore Line Discovery Trail at the Spanish Municipal Marina. This 2.5 km hiking trail (1 hour to complete) starts at the waterfront complex: at the foot of rocky bluffs, climb the stairs to the gazebo. From the gazebo, enjoy a 360 degree view that overlooks the Spanish River Delta, the Whalesback Channel, the town and Sagamok Anishnawbek. 


View from the gazebo, Shoreline Discovery Trail. (Photo credit: Martin Lortz)

Bootlegger’s Bay on Hwy 538 got its name during prohibition in the 1920s when Algoma Mills was a booming port; the little bay became famous for ships to dump cases of liquor.

Swim at Lake Lauzon Beach and Lauzon Creek is good fishing spot for spring smelts and Coho salmon fishing. 

Blind River has a rich lumber history, and is situated on Lake Huron. Learn about the town’s history at the Timber Village Museum and Art Gallery. In the summer, there are a number of festivals and events that take place. The Boom Camp Interpretive Park is 12 km of trail made up of three main loops.


(Photo credit: Martin Lortz)

Points of Interest: Kennebec Falls at the Serpent River Parkette, Serpent River Trading Post, Clarence’s Fish Market (smoked fish)
Eat on the Route: Lucky’s Snack Bar, Waterfalls Lodge Restaurant, The Nest Breakfast & Beyond, Pier Seventeen
Overnight on the Route: Serpent River Campground, Almenara en el Rio Campground, Mitchell’s Camp, Lake Lauzon Resort, motels and bed & breakfasts
Related: Things to Do on the Deer Trail

Blind River to Bruce Mines (about 80 km or 4 hrs)

- Add 20 km if detouring to Thessalon

This area has a rich history of farming and logging. Through the summer, Iron Bridge and the Huron Shores area celebrates its history with country music festivals, fall fairs and community festivals.


Iron Bridge Historical Museum. (Photo credit: Martin Lortz)

Little Rapids is home to the Heritage Park Museum and the Little Rapids General Store on Hwy 129. The Heritage Park hosts an annual country fair and auction every Civic Holiday weekend.


Little Rapids General Store. (Photo credit: Martin Lortz)

There are two 12-sided barns located in Algoma, and The Round Barn Gift Shop is one of them. This historic barn is sells antiques, clothing and gifts.

The cycle route takes you into Bruce Mines at Bruce Station. Visit the Bruce Mines Museum, Simpson Copper Mine Shaft, enjoy butter tarts or an ice cream cone.

Points of Interest: Veterans Bridge (pedestrian bridge allows bicycles), Iron Bridge Historical Museum, Forestland Clothing and Gifts

Eat on the Route: Red Top Motor Inn, Mississagi Fry Company on Mississagi First Nation, Carolyn Beach Inn, Bobbers Restaurant, Red House Ice Cream Parlour
Overnight on the Route: Red Top Motor Inn, Birchland Cottages, Carolyn Beach Inn, Sunset Beach, Bruce Bay Cottages & Lighthouse

Bruce Mines to Sault Ste. Marie (About 70 km or 3.5 hrs)

- Hwy 548 off Hwy 17 leads to St. Joseph Island

Desbarats, in Johnson Township, is a small farming community. Many Mennonite families live in the area and sell produce at the Johnson Farmers’ Market. The Johnson Farmers’ Market is open Saturdays June to Thanksgiving and have a waterfront site in Bruce Mines open Wednesdays in July and August.


Old World and Modern World mix on this cycle route. (Photo credit: Martin Lortz)

In the fall, the Sylvan Circle Tour is held. It’s a one-day self-guided artisan tour featuring original paintings, arts and crafts, carvings, jewellery and more made by local artisans.

Points of Interest: The Loon Dollar Monument (Echo Bay), Family Tree Native Crafts (Garden River)


Loon Dollar Monument in Echo Bay. (Photo credit: Martin Lortz)

Eat on the Route: Bucci’s Place, Noel’s Place
Overnight on the Route: Ojibway Tent & Trailer Park, Surfside Bed and Breakfast

Sault Ste. Marie is the largest city in Algoma and is home to many museums, galleries, festivals and events, concerts, shopping, restaurants, and accommodations as well as trail systems. 

Trail Systems: John Roswell Hub Trail is a 25-km multi-use trail system throughout the city, Hiawatha Highlands consisting of 40 km of trails. Cyclists can reach Lake Superior via a ride to Gros Cap. Both Hiawatha Highlands and the Gros Cap Conservation Area are part of the Saulteaux section of the Voyageur Hiking Trail.


Lake Superior is a beautiful way to end the journey. (Photo credit: Martin Lortz)

A Few Things to Do on the Route: Visit Northern Breweries for a craft brew, cycle on the bike path of the city’s waterfront, visit the museums and historic sites, eat ice cream, bike on Whitefish Island


Cheers! Northern Breweries. (Photo credit: Martin Lortz)

The Lake Huron Waterfront Trail was signed in the spring of 2017. The official launch was July 1, 2017 – the year Canada celebrates its 150th birthday.

To learn more about the Waterfront Trail visit www.lhncwaterfronttrail.ca. There’s a map of the route and lots of photos!

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