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Paddling Quetico Park

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While it might take you more than one trip to see all the parks, once you see one, you'll want to camp at all the Provincial Parks in Ontario.



With 100,000 square kilometers of forest and 70,000 lakes, rivers and streams, Sunset Country has its fair share of Ontario Provincial Parks. These beautiful parks are located alongside most of the major highways in the region and if you love the outdoors, camping, fishing, swimming or hiking, these are a great destination choice.

If you have two weeks to spare and you want to experience Ontario's natural assets then we can think of no better idea than to spend 14 days visiting these parks. Here is a summary of what awaits you - done on a highway basis - meaning these parks are located on or near these highways.

Highway 17

Aaron Provincial Park - Dryden: Explore the waters of Thunder Lake and camp under the stars on a beautiful summer night. Aaron Provincial Park near Dryden offers a wide variety of spots to choose from and two beaches you can swim at. Access the services of the nearby City of Dryden.

Blue Lake Provincial Park  - Vermilion Bay: Blue Lake is known for its incredible water clarity and the excellent trails and outdoor recreational opportunities located inside the park. The park is located just west of Vermilion Bay, Ontario.

Highway 71

Rushing River Provincial Park - Kenora: One of the region's more scenic waterways is beautiful Rushing River which drains the waters of Dogtooth Lake into Blindfold Lake. Located just southeast of Kenora on Highway 71, Rushing River is a very popular destination.

Sioux Narrows Provincial Park - Sioux Narrows: Located on Ontario's Lake of the Woods just north of Sioux Narrows, Ontario this is a lesser known but extraordinarily beautiful part of the region. In addition to spectacular fishing, this park has huge white pines and an aura of history as it is located near the famous ambush of the invading Sioux by the local Ojibway people at the narrows that give this park its name.

Caliper Lake Provincial Park - Nestor Falls:  Located on Caliper Lake near Nestor Falls,  this small picturesque park is surrounded by towering red and white pine trees. You can  go canoeing, fishing, boating, swimming or hiking.

Great beach at Sioux Narrows Provincial Park

Highway 599

Sandbar Lake Provincial Park - Ignace: Located just north of Ignace, Ontario on the Highway 599 Wilderness Corridor, Sandbar Lake is the largest of 10 lakes in the immediate area. This park and the region around it is known for some awesome pike and walleye fishing and and this area also shows strong evidence of the forces of glaciation which occurred across the Sunset Country region.

Highway 72

Ojibway Provincial Park - Sioux Lookout: Located on Little Vermilion Lake between Dinorwic and Sioux Lookout, this 50 site campground does not require reservations. It offers a sandy beach, swimming and great smallmouth bass fishing. The park lakes link to several major northern canoe routes. 

Highway 105

Pakwash Lake Provincial Park - Red Lake/Ear Falls: This northern park is a true jewel in the wilderness and offers a fantastic swimming area and a multitude of great camp sites. You can also go into town in Red Lake or to Ear Falls if you need groceries or just feel like shopping.

 Morning Mist at Quetico Dawson Trail Campground

Highway 11

Quetico Provincial Park - Atikokan: One of the most famous parks in Ontario and in fact North America, Quetico Provincial Park is located just south of Atikokan. For those driving, your best chance to experience the wonders of this awesome park are to stay at the Dawson Trail Campground.

Highway 11/17

Kakabeka Falls Provincial Park - Thunder Bay: Located in Kakabeka Falls, just 20 minutes from Thunder Bay, this park boasts a 40 metre high stunning waterfall. The are three campgrounds: Whispering Hills, Riverside and Fern’s Edge which have a variety of campsites including electrical and non-electrical sites.

Fourteen days may not be enough to see all of these wonderful parks but it will allow you to see some of them. Besides, there's always next year! To help you plan your trip and to obtain a map of Northwestern Ontario, contact Sunset Country Travel Association.

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